PREMIERE + INTERVIEW: Human Movement and Made in Paris release the biggest club track of the year, ‘Feel Me’

human movement

Human Movement and Made in Paris have both established themselves as revered tastemakers in Australian Underground dance. Having shared stages, remixes and a close personal friendship, the power duo are set to release their collaborative single, Feel Me out tomorrow (30th July) via Of Leisure. We are extremely grateful to be exclusively premiering the single today. 

The track follows closely from the release of both producers’ magnum opus work to date. Human Movement’s KINETIC EP established a new sound for the project, propelling it into the laps of left field dance tastemakers globally. Similarly, Made in Paris’ 2021 Exordium mini-album solidified Paris as truly beyond her years as a producer, cutting out a lane in melodic techno that aligns her with the greats of the genre.

With both producers operating in two distinct dance lanes, they mould together to create a tune smack bang in between their sonic identities. The final destination is front left on a club dancefloor, creating a track that’s screaming out to be played at 90 decibels by DJs globally celebrating the resurgence of club culture. Both artists’ unique ability to create atmospheric yet driving percussion is well on show here, with the tracks driving kick and high hats acting as the beating pulse of its 6 minute run time. Eerie vocal lines set its anthemic tone combining perfectly with the track’s ethereal rave melodies.

‘Feel Me’ is premiering exclusively below. To get to know Made in Paris and Human Movement’s new release better, we chat about their friendship, meeting in the middle of their sonic palettes and the power of a club tune.

How have your motivation levels been in the past couple of weeks. What strategies have you used to keep your motivation and energy up, especially given how important the live space is for the both of you?

Made in Paris: For me it’s been super testing. Just going into another lockdown again with shows getting moved again. You’ve got music you’re finally set to release that align with shows. It’s definitely a big drainer and it effects creatively definitely. It’s tough, and the context is hard to make good dance music. I’ve been trying to just pause. I’m such a doer though, so it’s so hard to just sit back and not do anything or not create. There’s a lot of internal fighting. 

Human Movement: Obviously it’s super draining, especially putting out dance music with everything closed right now. I do find that it’s been a good time to focus on my production and take a step back from DJing and the live headspace. Surprisingly, I’m on the opposite end of the spectrum, without performing I have a clearer vision and headspace, so my production tends to get better. Since this lockdown I’ve put together nearly a whole new EP. Obviously I’d prefer if we weren’t locked down. I’m like Paris in the sense that I’m a doer, I feel like I need to make the most of this time. 

Human Movement it’s super interesting with how unlucky you’ve been with your release schedule. Last year you released your biggest club tool yet in ‘Elevate’ right as lockdown started, and now this track is definitely in that club lane aswell.

HM: This track is definitely very club focussed. It’s definitely something to be played out with massive energy. Even though we are in lockdown we are trying to stay positive with Europe opening up at the moment, so hopefully it picks up with DJs overseas.

When did you two first meet?

HM: Vi from Motorik said that we should collaborate really early on. I shot Paris a message on Facebook. We had a few goes at trying to make something but it felt like there was too many cooks in the kitchen, so nothing that great came out of it. After the Human Movement project restructured to solo, we decided to give it another go. We decided not to do a studio session for it, so that we could have our own time to work on it, just to do what we wanted to do without having another person in the studio. 

Paris do you agree that the creative process being done separately benefitted the sound of the track?

MiP I think so. Our music can be quite different. Having us go back and forth gave us room as artists to express ourselves in different ways and importantly lay our sounds together in cool ways. I feel like that worked because our sounds are so different in underground dance. When you’re in the studio with someone in the same genre and same vibe that typically flows well, but with two distinctive sounds, the back and forth makes it really easy to combine our sounds and meet in the middle. 

How much did trust play a part in creating the track through that digital format?

MiP: Usually when I collaborate with someone I choose them over whether I like them as a person and trust them before I decide if I enjoy their music. It has to have the love in there too, and it makes what we are cooking up even more special.

HM: It’s always the friendship first, and if they have the right production chops, Paris certainly does, then that’s the next step. 

I’ll pose this question to both of you individually. What did you want to draw from the other person’s production abilities that elevated your individual sound?

HM: Paris started the idea, which was super helpful. It gave me a gauge on what the track was going to be. I feel like you can really distinguish each sound of who produced it. Paris’ overall sound choice and textures clicked for me straight away. It really cemented the direction of the track. 

MiP: Once I got back what Eddy had done to it I just recorded in some cool sounds. I let him evolve the structure and elements. I always knew though we would get that classic Human Movement energy on the track. I originally sent it to him at 124bpm, and now its 130bpm. 

HM: We had to meet in the middle, usually I kick my tracks off at 135bpm so I decided we’d keep it calm at 130bpm. 

Human Movement you’re one to sit on a lot of unreleased gems and spin a heap of IDs, including this one having seen the light of day at shows before people can hear it. How important is the ‘road test’ in your creative process and deciding your output?

HM: My first show back at Civic I played it and it was one of the highest energy songs of the night. 

MiP: It was actually crazy it went off, I was standing right behind Eddy.

HM: Playing demos out in sets is one of the most important part of the creative process. It gives a gauge on how the audience is going to react to it. If they don’t react well it’s back to the drawing board. If they do react well you know you’ve got something.

MiP: That’s why it’s so crucial to use live shows as inspiration. It might be why we are struggling a bit as music producers to have that creativity. It’s my main source of realising whether it’s a sick dance track or not. 

You’ve both come off respective massive left leaning electronic projects, in ‘Exordium’ and ‘KINETIC’. How rewarding and fun was it creating a fully focussed club track as your next release?

MiP: We both love a good party. We love great music and we love when a song hits perfectly on a dancefloor. I trusted both our energies could cook off something perfect for that. The goal was to make a banger, and I think we did it. 

HM: In our own personal projects we do get experimental with things, with soundscapes and emotional builds etc. So when we did get together we though, let’s just make a big banging 4/4 club track.  

Words by PARRY TRITSINIOTIS

LISTEN TO NEW MUSIC HERE

SEE ALSO
MADE IN PARIS ON ‘PURSUIT’, HER DEFINITIVE YEAR & THE IMPORTANCE OF WELLBEING
HUMAN MOVEMENT UNLEASHES NEW SINGLE, ‘ELEVATE’

About:

Parry Talks, and also writes.